Friday, 12 December 2014

First Winter Covering of Snow on Largo Law

The fields to the east of the Serpentine Walk were still green today but there was a light covering of snow on Largo Law.

The ruins of Largo House beneath a snow covered Largo Law.

Saturday, 6 December 2014

An Orange Fungus

Noticed this orange fungus growing beneath the hedge  in the garden. Although it doesn't look quite like the pictures in the field guides or on line, I think it must be the orange peel fungus (Aleuria aurantia). It does indeed look like discarded orange peel. As here, it usually grows on damp bare soil and is common found in the autumn and early winter.

Monday, 1 December 2014

At Last a Sunny Day

The sun sets directly behind the wind turbine in Methil.
After several gloomy, dreich days the sun shone all day yesterday and at dusk there was a lovely sunset.

It was a delight to walk along the beach looking back to the sunset.




A pink-tinged sky behind the trees.


Tuesday, 18 November 2014

The Iron Bridge

A stopover at Ironbridge in Shropshire, on the way to and from a visit to Hampshire - this iconic bridge spans the River Severn here.  Built by Abraham Darby III and opened in 1781, it was the first arch bridge in the world to be made of cast iron.

The view from the bridge as the lights come on in the town. The spectacular Ironbridge Gorge has been classified as a World Heritage Site since 1986.
 The view from the other side of the bridge.
 At night the bridge is floodlit.

Monday, 17 November 2014

No Access to Lower Largo Pier

Have been away for a few days and there has obviously been a storm during that time and further damage done to the pier at Lower Largo. The whole of it has now been blocked off, leaving no access to the pier from the car park.

Monday, 3 November 2014

Sea Squirts

Found these odd-shaped creatures, about 3 cms. high, stranded on the beach at Lundin Links. At first thought they were dead-mans fingers but decided against that as they were translucent and jelly-like. Fortunately met someone more knowledgeable who told me that they were sea squirts. Not sure of the identification but possibly Ascadiella scabra.

Sea Squirts also known as ascidians, are a marine class of animals that fall between the invertebrates and the vertebrates. They are simple animals that are often categorised with the invertebrates, however in their larval stage they do possess primitive vertebrate characteristics.   
                 
Although, as here, they may form clusters these particular sea squirts live as individual animals. They feed by siphoning nutrients from sea water. There are two short tubes or siphon openings which allow a flow of water through the body. Water is drawn through the inhalant siphon, and then expelled via the exhalent siphon. As the water circulates through the body; food and oxygen are removed from it and waste products are expelled.

If they are disturbed, they will force the water they contain out of both siphons at the same time which is how they get their name of sea squirt.

Saturday, 1 November 2014

Trees Felled

A few days ago I noticed red crosses on two of the large beech trees in the Serpentine Walk in Largo and yesterday saw that they had indeed been felled. This one was probably the largest tree in the walk but it had looked diseased for some time.


 Another tree gone close to the northern end of the path.